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Posted 5 months ago 11/23/2013 07:52 PM

NEW ARRIVAL!! 

997 TURBO CABRIOLET!! 

Call Us For More INFO!!

Los Angeles Dismantler
Phone : 818-767-7243

We test every single item before shipping. Shop with confidence. Your satisfaction is our priority.Refunds will not be issued due to fitment problems please do your research before buying.Purchaser is responsible for all applicable sales tax.PAYPAL Customers:PAYPAL REQUIRES WE SHIP TO YOUR CONFIRMED PAYPAL ADDRESS WITH SIGNATURE CONFIRMATION.Free shipping within the Continental US, International Delivery is available, costs are estimated so please call or email us for more information.


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Posted 12 months ago 05/03/2013 10:01 PM

Precious Porsche Parts.

Part automobile graveyard, part Porsche enthusiast's dream: welcome to the surreal world of the LA Dismantler, the planet's largest P-car breakers and salvage company.

The US has always provided a special market for the Porsche 911. From race cars to production cars, the history of 911's coming to the States goes as far back as the birth of the marque itself. Indeed, Porsche even changed 
their body design to cater for US markets with the introduction of impact bumpers on G-series models in 1974. 911s have always been predominantly 
prevalent in California’s Golden State – Los Angeles in particular – and specialty shops and dealers are in abundance. Old or new, it doesn’t matter: if you’re looking for something Porsche, or indeed something special, your chances of finding it in this part of the world are high. It’s little wonder, then, that this is also the place where you’ll find the planet’s largest Porsche salvage, scrap and breakers premises, aptly named the Los Angeles Dismantler.
 
Located in the city of Sun Valley, Magnus Walker and I were invited by the Dismantler team to catch a glimpse of what happens behind the borders of 
their well-protected facility north of LA. 
We arrived early in the afternoon, and after a quick phone call to employee Neil de Jager, who was going to give us the tour, he came to open up the large gate to let us in. As soon as we stepped inside, the first thing we were greeted with was an Eighties yellow 930, which by all accounts actually looked in great condition. Neil then points out the car has arrived at the LA Dismantler after the engine was destroyed in a fire, but agrees the bodywork still holds up. A fine basis for an interesting project car, perhaps? Elsewhere, older and newer 911s, as well as Boxsters, Caymans and Cayennes, were stacked high in storage racks around the place.

It’s clear to see business is thriving.Originally starting life as a Honda-specific yard about 30 years ago, dismantling was more of a hobby before eventually turning into a fulltime job here. Then, 15 years ago, the owner of the LA Dismantler got more and more serious about Porsches and Porsche parts, opening up another small shop, which promptly became too small. A move to the current location only seven years ago has since helped the LA Dismantler grow into a thriving Porsche parts business – so much so that the guys are also making use of two extra warehouses a few miles away from these headquarters.
That’s quite a lot of Porsches, then, when you consider that this warehouse stores 300 salvaged cars alone!
According to LA Dismantler employee Caleb, the other two storage units 
are stacked with cars and parts to its maximum capacity, too. All three warehouses carry the same era of cars and parts, meaning LA Dismantler specialises in Porsches ranging from the early Eighties right up to today’s latest variants. 911s preceding the Eighties are generally hard to come 
by here, as the 30-odd year old parts are too worn for the LA Dismantlers to feasibly sell on. 

At the time of our visit, there were five employees working inside the workshop, dismantling various mangled Porsches and storing the parts in the devoted storage racks according to categories. In the office, there were another five men who specialise in selling salvaged Porsche spare parts 
to clients around the world. Neil told us people ordered from as far away as Japan, Singapore, Europe and even Australia. Incredibly, a lot of stuff is even going back to Germany. Phone calls are constant in the office, and it’s here you get a real sense of the enormity of the business. Porsche owners need Porsche parts, afterall. Since Porsche tends to keep its engines and 
transmissions safely tucked away from the frontal impact zone most often involved in crashes, there’s frequently a lot of valuable components here still in perfect condition. As such, engines are by far the most popular parts being sold, with transmissions a solid second. Air-cooled motors are regularly being sold, and these often go in 911 hot rods and backdate projects. Water-cooled engines, however, are often used to fix up newer Porsches which have been in an accident where the engine was badly damaged, or where a severe engine problem was found. Incredibly, at least one engine a day is sold here, but the amount of time a car or its parts will 
spend in the Dismantler’s storage rack depends mostly on the extent of the damage to the car when it came in. Some will only be there for two weeks, 
while others have been sitting in storage for up to five years. When it comes to actually buying in 911 stock, the team often goes through auction websites from insurance companies, but before they do they always make sure to buy every car with a clean title and VIN and check the seller’s ID, because they want to know where the seller comes from. It’s mandatory, not only for their own purposes, but also because they get periodical visits from 
the DMV, who do random checkups on vehicle identification numbers. 

Here’s how the process works: if the Dismantler has a customer in Japan who is looking for a GT2 gearbox, the guys try to find a crashed GT2, buy 
it, take it apart and sell the gearbox to their client. The rest of the car gets parted out, and all these bits go on the LA Dismantler webshop.
Neil tells us that they sell to a lot of race teams as well, who are mainly looking for 911s which can be rebuilt as race cars. Interestingly, ‘hybrid guys’, as Neil calls them (those who put LS1 V8s in their Porsches), are also becoming rather popular customers of late.

For purists, the concept of a Porsche breakers may well take some getting used to, but for those who like to actively play with their 911s, this supercar graveyard can, in fact, become heaven on Earth. Even as we walk around, a feeling akin to a kid in a candy store constantly springs to mind. The lure of premium parts at close hand even proved too much for Magnus, who used his eagle eyes to hunt down a beautiful set of old Fuchs wheels on a storage rack at the back of the shop.

As you can see, there’s only one place you should consider calling the next time you’re looking for that hard-to-find Porsche part, where an LA 
Dismantler will be there ready to answer you.

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Posted over 1 year ago 11/16/2012 07:28 PM

Turbo CabThe 993 Porsche never offered in the U.S.—or anywhere—officially.Story and Photos by Zachary Mayne

WHEN JOHN MERVIN BOUGHT HIS 1995 CARRERA 4 CABRIOLET, it was a good secondhand buy, a 993 that just needed a little sorting to make into a truly great car. “It was a little neglected and needed some freshening up,” says Mer­vin, who pauses before he makes an admission: “I just took that a little too far.”

How far did the Berkeley, Cali­fornia resident go? The car now does a pretty convincing impersonation of a 993 Turbo Cabriolet, a model Por­sche never offered. In fact, prior to the 996-based Turbo Cab­riolet that the company launched in 2004, Porsche officially had only offered a 911 Turbo Cab­riolet from 1987 to 1989.

However, Por­sche — being Porsche — has always quietly turned out a few factory specials. Witness the 993 Speedster, a model variant that kind of exists only because Jerry Seinfeld and the late F.A. “Butzi” Porsche wanted one. So while there was never a production 993 Turbo Cabriolet, there was a small batch of 993 Cabriolets that got Turbo bodywork and a turbocharged flat six.

“According to Adrian Streather’s Por­sche 993, The Essential Companion, ‘a Porsche dealer from Munich, Germany asked the Exclusive Department to build twelve Turbo Cabriolets,’” explains Mer­vin. According to Streather, the factory ended up building 14 examples. The book also goes on to explain that the 993 Turbo Cabriolets utilized theCIS-injected, single-turbo flat six from the 964 Turbo and produced 360 hp. All of them were based on the rear-wheel-drive 993 chassis, rather than the 993 Turbo’s all-wheel-drive setup. In reality, they were merely turbocharged, drop-top versions of the 993 Carrera and far from the technological wonder that the 993 Turbo coupe was.

“I wanted to build the 993 Turbo that Porsche did not make, at least in any significant numbers,” says Mervin. Actually, scratch that: Porsche didn’t sell anything close to the car Mervin would end up building, since his take would have significantly more power and even better handling. It is, for all intents and purposes, a far more authentic take on the concept than even the back-door factory cars were.

Mervin acquired the 993 in 2008 after a business trip to Eugene, Oregon. “I spotted it for sale at a Kia dealership, which was a shock. Someone had traded it in on a new Kia!” he says, shaking his head. “I’m not sure you could call that moving up in the world.”

He couldn’t resist stopping in to take a closer look. An admitted fan of Porsche Cabriolets and convertible sports cars in general, Mervin has owned a 1966 Datsun Roadster, a 1966 Jaguar XK-E roadster, and multiple 911 Targas over the years. At the time, he had a 1958 356A Cabriolet that had been imported from Belgium. He still has the car, which he bought from an elderly woman and restored over time. The 993 that he found himself looking over at the Kia dealer looked like a bargain.

“It was in clean, used shape, and it had never been in an accident,” he says. Its paint had faded a bit, its body had a few dings, and its once-beautiful wheels had seen better days, but the Por­sche ran great. The only obstacle was convincing his wife, Nan, that the 993 was a smart purchase — a task he tackled as soon as he flew home.

“I had young children at the time, and convinced my wife that it was plenty big enough for the kids and her too…” begins Mervin. “I neglected to mention that the kids might have to forgo circulation in their legs while riding in the back, but hey, whatever it takes.” In the end, he managed to convince her the modern, ostensibly four-seat Porsche was the perfect family car. A few days later, Mervin flew back to Oregon and drove the 993 home.

While his wife chuckled good-naturedly when she saw the sorry excuse for a back seat all 911s are known for, Mervin couldn’t have been happier with his acquisition. “Having owned many 356s, 912s, and 911s, the 993 represents the pinnacle of the air-cooled 911,” he says. “The power, braking, multi-link — as opposed to torsion-bar and trailing-arm — rear suspension… (it) has a powerful, refined, and well-engineered feel.” On a side note, Mervin even tried to find a rare factory Por­sche baby seat, but was ultimately unsuccessful.

This might be the end of the story for most. But, you know, boy meets car, boy and car live happily ever after — it was really only the beginning of a new chapter for Mervin and his 993 Cabriolet.

“I suffer from Upgrade-itis,” he admits. “If some is good, more is better. And more is never enough.” Compound­ing his hard-to-treat affliction, Mervin became aware of the aforementioned rare factory special shortly after he bought the 993. He also liked the 993 Turbo coupe, so he decided to create the best of both worlds.

“I certainly would have been money ahead had I sold the Cab and bought a factory Turbo hardtop,” he says. “But what fun would that be?”

From the outset, Mervin decided to split the project up into digestible chunks rather than tackle the transformation in one, big process. The engine and driveline were first to receive attention. “My goal was to have the car drive­able in between upgrades,” he says. “I look forward to driving this car.”

Researching shops that could handle the work led him to TurboKraft in Mesa, Arizona. A phone call to shop owner Chris Carroll led to the conclusion that transplanting a real 993 Turbo engine was a better move than turbocharging the existing, naturally-aspirated 3.6. Not long after, a 993 Turbo engine, complete with wiring harness and engine control unit, were sourced from LA?Dismantler in SoCal.

Carroll opened the motor and found that the internals were still in fine enough shape to use without a rebuild, so the pistons were simply de-carboned before the case was buttoned up. The cylinder heads, on the other hand, were rebuilt with new guides and oversize exhaust valves. In the quest for more power, the stock K16 turbo­­chargers that Porsche originally specified were remanufactured and fitted with the larger compressor wheels from K24 units.

The factory Turbo mufflers were then modified for improved airflow as well as a louder exhaust note. These terminate in stainless-steel Dansk Sport exhaust tips. When the engine was purchased, it came with a modified ECU, which helped the refreshed engine produce a claimed 385 hp and 426 lb-ft of torque at the wheels.

“This is approximately 450 horsepower and 500 pound-feet at the flywheel — stronger than a 993 Turbo and comparable to a street 993 GT2,” says Carroll.

This 993 retains its original six-speed transmission rather than the G64/51 unit used in the 993 Turbo. “Since Turbo gearboxes are rare and expensive, with longer gearing more suitable for the autobahn than street driving, the decision to retain the shorter C4 transmission was a clear one,” explains Carroll. “It results in a car that’s more fun to drive on the hilly, narrow roads of Northern California.

There’s one hitch, though: “The Turbo six-speed is nearly an inch longer than the non-Turbo transmission,” notes Carroll. “This positions the engine farther back in the chassis, and all of the engine peripherals (such as) the air-guide sheetmetal, motor mount, intake plenum and tubes, intercooler and air guide, (and) exhaust tips are designed to fit in this aft position.” Carroll says you can run into interference and serious serviceability problems if the 993 Turbo engine is merely installed in the same spot as a naturally-aspirated 3.6.

To position the twin-turbocharged flat six in the same place it would be in a 993 Turbo, an engine-and-clutch spacer was engineered and fabricated. Carroll also installed what he calls an “RS Touring flywheel,” which is a bit heavier than a 993 RS flywheel to keep the engine from stalling at idle but far lighter than the C4’s original dual-mass flywheel. A 993 Turbo clutch assembly was used with the accompanying hydraulics, including the power-steering pump, reservoir, lines, and slave cylinder.

With more power came more motivation to improve the rest of the car’s performance, particularly in regards to the braking and handling. To that end, a set of Bilstein PSS-9 coil-­overs and a front strut brace were added. Adjustable rear toe-links were installed to ensure that the car could be correctly aligned when lowered. Once the car was delivered back to Mer­vin’s home in the Berkeley hills, it was handed over to S-Car-Go in nearby San Rafael, where factory 993 Turbo brakes were installed to allow the Porsche to stop as well as it accelerated.

With a driveline that was now approximating that of a 993 Turbo, the last piece of the puzzle was making the car look like one. Mervin got lucky when he found a set of OEM bumpers and inner bodywork being sold by a Canadian racer who was installing more radical bodywork on his 993 race car.

“The rear wing came from LA Dis­mant­ler,” says Mervin. “The rear quarters, rockers, and underside plastic were new from Por­sche.” Chris Jones at Canyon Auto Rebody in Mehama, Oregon handled the cosmetic work. Why send the car so far away? On yet another business trip, Mervin came across Canyon Auto Body in the local PCA newsletter. “When I called Chris and gave him the scope of the project, he said he would get back to me after considering it,” says Mervin. “He emailed a quote, and we haggled back and forth to keep the cost down. Then we agreed to a price.”

The first step was stripping much of the existing bodywork away and replacing it with the wider Turbo bodywork. “The most difficult part was the rocker panels and the rear quarter panels,” explains Mervin. “Porsche didn’t make (Turbo) Cab­riolet rear quarters, so Chris had to modify the factory pieces to conform to the Cabriolet top mounting.”

The top edge of the quarter panels were carefully reworked and massaged to allow the bottom edge of the soft top to fit properly for a factory look. “I spent a lot of time scouring factory manuals and parts diagrams to determine just what was different about the Turbo,” recalls Mervin. “It was a lot of work for a fairly subtle change to the exterior.” The finished body was painted Midnight Blue, the car’s original color.

The “illusion of factory” is completed by a set of 18-inch, hollow-spoke Turbo wheels wrapped in sticky 225/40R18 and 285/30R18 Michelin tires.

The result of all the work that went into this 993 is stunning. In person, it looks factory fresh — as if Porsche just rolled it off the assembly line. Swing­ing the door open for a drive reveals the fact that Mervin didn’t neglect the interior, either. 993 hardback sport seats with Midnight Blue backs and black leather surfaces were installed. Con­tinuing the theme, the rest of the interior was liberally swathed in black leather supplied by Autos International, which also provided the carpeting. The center console matches the exterior, while a three-spoke 996 GT2 steering wheel was installed. When Mervin acquired the 993, it came with a rare Root Wood shifter, which I grasp as I reach for the ignition key.

The twin-turbo 3.6 wakes up with a hollow whir. Despite the modified mufflers, the powerful flat six sounds surprisingly civilized. Clutch effort is considerable and, with a lightened flywheel, moving away from a stop smoothly takes a little practice. Once underway, though, any niggling complaints about the clutch fade quickly. The six-speed manual is a joy to operate, with relatively short throws and a light, positive action.

Down a straight road, this Cabriolet positively bolts for the horizon. The acceleration becomes considerably stronger around 3000 rpm. By 4000 rpm, the car is lunging ahead, pushed inexorably down the road by those deep-breathing hybrid turbochargers. It’s the kind of power that pushes you firmly back in your seat, if not quite pinning you to the leather. Into third and then fourth gear, it doesn’t take long to get well into triple digits. Lift off the throttle for a corner, and the exhaust pops and bangs fantastically on the overrun.

Over bumps and dips, the front end goes light in typical 911 fashion, with the steering wheel writhing in my hands as the front tires hunt for traction. Commit to a corner and you’ll find the car to be fantastically grippy thanks to its all-wheel-drive, compliant coil-overs, and fat tires. While the feedback delivered by the 993’s chassis is neither as fine nor as generous as a 996 Turbo’s, there is enough information coming in through the wheel and the seat of the pants to know what the tires are up to.

There is an occasional rattle from the doors and the body, a reminder that Por­sche has come a long way in the last 18 years when it comes to the rigidity of its convertibles. Overall, though, this is an incredibly stable, solid 911. It also feels surprisingly compact on these roads, a sensation gone missing in the latest 911s.

Ultimately, Mervin’s car is about all you could want from a convertible 993. It looks terrific, has tons of grip, and is awfully quick in a straight line. Perhaps best of all, he still drives it regularly. Says Mervin: “Once a week, I commute 105 miles each way to work — and this car makes that a fun trip every time.”

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Posted over 1 year ago 11/16/2012 05:56 PM

La Dismantler has been supplying top shelf parts to our customers for all types of aplications.

This recent show stopper 911 (AKA the Ninja Turtle) built by long standing customer Bisimoto is no exception,

Here is what they had to say about the car.

"The Bisimoto 911 cab blurs the lines between classic beauty and modern technology by modifying a 1981 Cabriolet to an ultra wide-body custom 530hp Porsche Carrera.  Using the latest performance electronics, a 3.0L air-cooled twin turbo powerplant, and a 5-speed gearbox were utilized to create the ultimate “military themed” street monster. The goal of my build was to combine the best 911 elements of the old, with the new. The electronics are amazing, as I used an AEM Series 2 EMS with drive-by-wire technology, and full CAN BUS protocol. Even the engineers at AEM are shocked that we got it to work so well.

 

We also upgraded the cylinders, made custom rods, and used custom Arias forged pistons with a mil-spec harness.

 

The purpose of the build was to build a street-able race-spec vehicle, and to explore the strengths of a unique electronics and chassis combination. The most challenging aspect was the setting up the unique engine management drive-by-wire systems, and the Bisimoto team succeeded with flying colors.  The plans are to take the vehicle for some high speed runs, and also perform some testing at the local drag strip and road-race courses.  There has been some huge interest in purchasing the vehicle by Porsche enthusiasts, and we will let her go, or replicate her…for the right price.

 

Powertrain Modifications:

Bisimoto built, Porsche 3.0L air cooled engine, base engine sourced from LA Dismantler

Bisimoto steel rods

Bisimoto heat shielding intake gasket,

Bisimoto spec 1000cc high impedance injectors

Bisimoto web level 2.4 camshafts

Arias 8.5:1 forged pistons, with ceramic coated tops, and moly coated skirts

AEM Series 2 EMS, with custom drive by wire control

High output smart ignition coils

Bisimoto drive-by-wire 76mm throttle body

AEM 3.5 bar MAP sensor

AEM Oil pressure sensor

AEM electronic boost control solenoid

K&N oil filter

NGK Iridium spark plugs

PurOl lubricants (10w-40 engine)

Custom Bisimoto JNF exhaust manifold

Twin Custom Turbonetics BTX5554 turbochargers

Turbonetics Godzilla blow-off valve

Twin Turbonetics RG-45 wastegates

Custom Spearco air-air intercooler

Driftmotion 2.5” aluminum piping

Bisimoto sleeved cylinders

5 speed gearbox, sourced from LA Dismantler

Custom Bisimoto-spec GE intake manifold

Griffin oil cooler

Vibrant Vanjen clamps and stainless hardware

Holley dominator 1800 billet fuel pump

ARP engine studs

Bisimoto custom headwork

AEM Water-methanol kit

Kinsler 100 and 25 micron fuel filters

 

Chassis/Suspension Modifications:

Leather clad chromoly roll cage

Bisimoto-Eibach full coilover helper rear suspension

RSR engine mounts

Eins Gramm 18x10.5 and 18x11 aluminum wheels, in powder coated semi-gloss black

Falken Azenis tires: 265/35R-18 (F), 275/35R-18 (R)

Bisimoto-spec Action 2MS Clutch

 

Exterior Modifications: 

Army green paint, by Rueda

Speedster hump

Type 2 graphics stickers

Bisimoto splitter infused front & rear bumpers, and side skirts, with Dzus fasteners

965 Turbo tail, sourced from LA Dismantler

Burns Stainless exhaust piping and hardware

 

Interior Modifications:

Bisimotowerks Ostrich inlayed seats, and full interior makeover

Bisimotowerks 11,000 rpm tachometer with shift light

Bisimoto fighter special gauge fit control box

Odyssey ER35MJ dry cell battery

Rywire mil-spec harness, with low resistance bulkheads

G&J braided fuel, and oil lines

Prototipo steering wheel

 

Project 2:

Bisimoto single turbo race vehicle

This is the flagship race car, being built for full competition.  Goal: 800+whp.

 

Powertrain Modifications:

Bisimoto built, air-cooled, Porsche 3.6L 964 engine, sourced from LA Dismantler

Bisimoto steel rods

Bisimoto heat shielding intake gasket

Bisimoto spec 1000cc high impedance injectors

Bisimoto web level 3.6 camshafts

Arias 9:1 forged pistons, with ceramic coated tops, and moly coated skirts

AEM Infinity EMS, with custom drive by wire control

High output smart ignition coils

Bisimoto drive-by-wire 82mm throttle body

AEM 5 bar MAP sensor

AEM Oil pressure sensor

AEM electronic boost control solenoid

K&N oil filter

NGK Iridium spark plugs

PurOl lubricants (20w-50 engine)

Custom Bisimoto JNF exhaust manifold

Single Custom Turbonetics BTX7265 turbocharger

Turbonetics Godzilla blow-off valve

Twin Turbonetics RG-45 wastegates

Custom Spearco air-air intercooler

Driftmotion 3” aluminum piping

Bisimoto/Arias sleeved cylinders

G50 5 speed gearbox, sourced from LA Dismantler

Custom Bisimoto-spec GE intake manifold

Griffin oil cooler

Custom aluminum fuel cell

Bisimoto Stainless steel intake and exhaust valves

Vibrant Vanjen clamps and stainless hardware

Holley dominator 1800 billet fuel pump

ARP engine studs

Bisimoto custom headwork

VP Racing C16 unleaded fuel

AEM water methanol kit

Kinsler 100 and 25 micron fuel filters

 

Chassis/Suspension Modifications:

NASA/POC/PCA spec chromoly roll cage

Bisimoto-Eibach full coilover suspension

Bisimoto anti-sway bars

Custom Buddy Club brake kit

RSR engine mounts

Eins Gramm 18x10.5 and 18x11 aluminum wheels, in powder coated grand prix white

Hankook Ventus TD tires: 265/30R-18 (F), 295/30R-18 (R)

Bisimoto-spec Action 2MS Clutch

 

Exterior Modifications: 

Bisimoto Race livery, courtesy of GatorWraps

Type 2 graphics stickers

Bisimoto splitter infused front & rear bumpers, and side skirts, with Dzus fasteners

Bisimoto custom turbo ducktail

Carbon creations GT concept 2 top wing

Burns Stainless exhaust piping and hardware

 

Interior Modifications:

Bisimotowerks halo racing seat

Racepak IQ3 dash

Odyssey ER35MJ dry cell battery

Rywire mil-spec harness, with low resistance bulkheads

G&J braided fuel, and oil lines

Rueda interior paint

Bisimoto steering release mechanism

Custom steering wheel

RS door panels

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Posted almost 2 years ago 06/28/2012 05:18 PM

http://993c4s.com/index.php?s=dismantler

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Posted almost 2 years ago 06/26/2012 11:13 PM

Read our review by the popular car news site Jalopnik.com

http://jalopnik.com/5801562/inside-las-largest-porsche-recycling-shop

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Posted about 3 years ago 04/08/2011 03:34 AM

We were featured on May 12, 2011 on a TV show, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC NATGEO Channel, Break it Down, our show is Porsche in Pieces.

 

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Posted about 3 years ago 04/08/2011 03:33 AM

On May 19, 2009, we made the cover of the Los Angeles Business Times. Click here for the full story!

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Posted about 3 years ago 04/08/2011 12:00 AM

Did you see our article in the November 2004 issue of Euro Breakers?

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